Seminar Colour Guide:              
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 28 March 2017, 11:00Add to calendarA specific role of Egf-receptor a in Medaka oogenesis
Eva Hasel, Heidelberg University, GermanyHost: Maria LeptinSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Company Representative
Wednesday, 29 March 2017, 10:00Add to calendarUpdates on Nanopore TechnologyClive Brown, Oxford Nanopore, USAHost: Vladimir BenesSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 30 March 2017, 11:00Add to calendarRecent Developments in Fast Bioorthogonal ChemistryJoseph Fox, University of Delaware, USAHost: Carsten SchultzSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 30 March 2017, 11:00Add to calendarData quality statistics, and getting the best data with XDS/XDSGUIDr. Kay Diederich, University of Konstanz, GermanyHost: Anne Sophie HummEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Friday, 31 March 2017, 10:00Add to calendarStructural and functional characterization of eIF4E1 and eIF4E2 complexes involved in translational controlDaniel Peter, MPI Developmental Biology, Tubingen, GermanyHost: Wojtek GalejEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 31 March 2017, 13:00Add to calendarIron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosisMichael Niederweis, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, USAHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Friday, 31 March 2017, 15:00Add to calendarThe problem with pseudoscienceMichael D. Gordin, Princeton University, USAHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: This presentation explores the unresolved demarcation problem that is, how to determine the boundary between science and pseudoscience from a historical perspective. After offering a taxonomy of the different categories of doctrines that have been tagged with the label over several centuries, the talk will focus on two specific instances in which the demarcation problem has become intertwined with debates over the professionalization of science, with divergent results: the rise and fall in popularity of the cosmic catastrophism of Immanuel Velikovsky; and contemporary controversies over denialism, often associated with antiregulatory policy positions.
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 6 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarSex-specific differences: X chromosome structure and regulation Christine Disteche, Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAHost: Phil AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Complex mechanisms of dosage compensation regulate the mammalian X chromosome due to the presence of one copy in males (XY) and two in females (XX). X inactivation silences one X chromosome in females in early development to equalize gene expression between males and females. This silencing process is mediated by a cascade of events including layers of epigenetic modifications and structural changes. The inactive X chromosome becomes condensed and forms a bipartite structure within the nucleus, as we have shown by chromatin conformation Hi-C analyses in mouse cells. CRISPR-Cas9 editing of a specific X-linked long non-coding RNA locus cause disruption of the 3D structure. The inactive X chromosome is preferentially located near the lamina or the nucleolus, which may help maintain its heterochromatin. X inactivation is incomplete and genes that escape X inactivation tend to be located at the periphery of the condensed inactive X chromosome. Such genes are more highly expressed in females, and thus associated with sex-specific differences manifested even in early development and in tissues from individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidy.
Science and Society
Friday, 7 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTracking large-scale outbreaks using infectious disease genomicsKristian Andersen, Scripps, STSI Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, La Jolla, California, USAHost: Halldór Stefánsson CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: The Ebola epidemic that ravaged West Africa from 2013 to 2016 was by far the largest outbreak of Ebola ever recorded. Weak healthcare infrastructure, overcrowded cities and community resistance to intervention allowed the epidemic to spin out of control. As the Ebola epidemic was winding down, another virus immediately took center stage - Zika. This virus had been causing multiple isolated epidemics since 2007, but was not recognized as a severe threat until it hit Brazil in 2015. It is now quickly spreading across the globe, causing a worldwide pandemic. Infectious disease outbreaks - such as those caused by Zika and Ebola - serve as stark reminders that emerging viruses pose one of the greatest threats to human health.

Our laboratory is using viral genomics, computational biology, and traditional molecular biology, to gain insights into how viruses emerge and spread in human populations. Our group sequenced and analyzed the first Zika virus dataset from local human transmissions and mosquitoes in Florida. All relevant data was immediately released into the public domain and our analyses made available via websites and online forums, before publication. Based on this data, we have been able to demonstrate that the Florida outbreak is much more complex than previously accepted. We show that multiple introductions happened into Florida in the spring of 2016 leading to sustained transmission chains. We show that these Zika virus lineages originated in the Caribbean and could have been brought to the United States via frequent cruise ship traffic. By modeling genomic data and mosquito abundance, we also show that Miami and Southern Florida is at particular risk for future Zika outbreaks.

Grubaugh et al. Multiple Introductions of Zika virus Into The United States Revealed Through Genomic Epidemiology. bioRxiv doi: 10.1101/104794 (2017).

Holmes, E. C., Duda, A., Rambaut, A. & Andersen, K. G. The Evolution of Ebola virus: Insights From the 2013-2016 Epidemic. Nature 538, 193-200 (2016).

Yozwiak, N. L. et al. Roots, Not Parachutes: Research Collaborations Combat Outbreaks. Cell 166, 5-8 (2016).

Andersen, K. G. et al. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus. Cell 162, 738-750 (2015).

Gire, S. K. et al. Surveillance Elucidates Ebola virus Origin and Transmission During The 2014 Outbreak. Science 345, 1369-1372 (2014).
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 7 April 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMatthias Wilmanns, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Friday, 7 April 2017, 14:00Add to calendarTransparent Publishing, Preprints & Open Science: how to share reproducible dataBernd Pulverer, EMBO, GermanyHost: Erika Pellegrini ILL Chadwick, EMBL Grenoble
Abstract: The biosciences are witnessing a rapid growth and diversification of research. Scientific progress depends on efficient mechanisms to select, quality control, archive, share and find reliable and reproducible research. The research paper remains the predominant mode of sharing peer-reviewed research findings, and a subset of scientific journals play important roles also as a proxy for quality and impact in research assessment. I will discuss how the editorial and peer review process at highly selective journals can be reformed to assess both the interest and quality of the claims made by a researcher, and also the reliability, reproducibility and integrity of the experimental data.
I will discuss forward looking policies and publishing modalities that facilitate sharing and discoverability of research data with minimal delay, focussing on EMBO Source Data policies and technology and Preprint servers. I will discuss the promises and challenges of the nascent preprint movement in the biosciences and highlight how preprints and papers can form a continuum for fast and reliable research communication.
In times of limited funding, the pressures to publish in a subset of journals can increase dramatically. I will discuss the challenges this poses to the publication process in the context of reproducibility and scientific integrity. I will discuss how a metrics centric research assessment process can undermine the quality of the research process, highlighting the San Francisco Declaration for Research Assessment (DORA) and other initiatives.
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 20 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendar The Circadian Clock and Sleep in Flies: Molecules, Neurons and
Circuits
Michael Rosbash, Brandeis Life Sciences Brandeis University, USAHost: Iain MattajSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 20 April 2017, 15:00Add to calendarCoSAXS, a multipurpose beamline at MAX IV: BioSAXS setups and data reduction pipelinesChristopher Söderberg, MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SwedenHost: Dmitri SvergunSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 21 April 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAnne-sophie Huart, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 24 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarNutritional Regulatory Networks Marian Walhout, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USAHost: Anne-Claude GavinThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Gene regulation and metabolism lie at the heart of most biological processes. Both are accomplished by complex networks harboring hundreds of nodes and thousands of edges. We study these networks and the interactions between them mainly in the nematode C. elegans, because it is amenable to high-throughput, large-scale genetics and genomics. In addition, we study interspecies network interactions between C. elegans and bacteria, that may help illuminate interactions between mammalian intestinal cells and the gut microbiota.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Tuesday, 25 April 2017, 11:00Add to calendarThree short stories about sex chromosomes Job Dekker, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USAHost: Yad Ghavi HelmThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: The 3D organization of the genome is critical for gene regulation. I will present three examples where sex chromosomes can serve as powerful models to study the folding of chromosomes in general, to identify cis-elements and proteins involved and to determine how chromosome organization and gene regulation are mechanistically linked.
Science and Society
Tuesday, 25 April 2017, 15:00Add to calendarEthical Review Goes Global: Learning the arts of a good ethical reviewRachel Douglas-Jones, IT University of Copenhagen, DenmarkHost: Halldór StefánssonSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Ethical review has been integrated into what counts as good science . But what constitutes a good ethical review? And what kind of model of decision-making is it? Since the early 2000s, capacity building in ethical review has been a priority in Europe and the USA, driven by an increase in collaborative and multi-sited clinical trials producing data in a range of settings. This presentation explores the growth in research ethics committees in the Asia-Pacific region, drawing on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork with a WHO-TDR funded non-governmental organisation, the Forum of Ethics Review Committees of Asia and the Pacific. The NGO, based in Bangkok, works to build capacity in ethical review, networking and training committees in ethics principles and practices. I first discuss the markers of competent review in countries with a range of different ideas about ethics and varying regulatory environments. I ask who should set the standards by which committees are assessed, and show debates over who should be responsible for assessing them. Having shown some of the factors driving the establishment of committees, I illustrate the growing motivation committees have to become recognised or accredited for their review practices. I conclude with a series of contrasting hopes for the future of ethical review meetings and standards.
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 27 April 2017, 13:00Add to calendarThe 18th Public MMPU Research DayThe 18th Public MMPU Research Day: 8 Speakers in total, Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit Heidelberg, NOT SPECIFIEDHost: Matthias Hentze and Andreas KulozikATC - Courtyard A+B, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Molecular Medicine
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 28 April 2017, 10:00Add to calendarSynaptic Processing of Visual Information in the RetinaLeon Lagnado, School of Life Sciences, , University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, United KingdomHost: Phil AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
Synapses are perhaps the most numerous computational elements within neural circuits. The process of chemical transmission can transform neural signals and, because synapses are plastic, these transformations can be altered over different time-scales to adjust the input-output relation of the circuit as a whole. I will describe experimental strategies that allow the synaptic basis of neural circuit function to be studied in vivo by imaging of genetically-encoded reporters. I will illustrate how these reporters can be used to analyze the synaptic processing of visual information in the retina of zebrafish. These strategies are revealing how the visual signal is first converted from an analogue format into spikes, as well as the synaptic changes that alter the input-output relation of the retinal circuit. In particular I will describe how plasticity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses can cause simultaneous increases and decreases in the gain of neural responses within distinct microcircuits of the inner retina. The general picture that emerges is one in which plasticity of synapses leads to dynamic changes in the encoding of visual stimuli.
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 28 April 2017, 13:00Add to calendarLanthanide-binding nanobodies as experimental phasing tools for membrane proteins and protein complexesSophie Zimmermann, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 5 May 2017, 13:00Add to calendarDissecting bacterial lifestyle with systems-based approachesNassos Typas, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: We work at the interface of systems biology and molecular mechanism. On one hand we develop and utilize high-throughput quantitative approaches that reveal functional interactions between genes at a whole cell level. On the other hand, we zoom into these networks to understand how different functional modules are interconnected, often at a detailed mechanistic level. Here I will present how we use such approaches to shed light into gene function and pathway organization, to understand the action of drugs and their interplay when combined, and to probe how protein machineries operate at the bacterial cell envelope- how they are organized, how they coordinate their actions and how the cell senses when they are malfunctioning. We have also recently moved our approaches to the host-pathogen interface and the dynamic microbial communities formed in our gut. Our main goals are to: a) elucidate pathways Salmonella uses to hijack its host machinery and b) to probe how gut microbial communities are formed, how they react to nutrition and pharmaceuticals, and how their composition and characteristics affects our health.
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 11 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarThe regulation of excitability within sensory neurons and pain pathogenesis: from molecule to manDavid Bennett, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, UK, United KingdomHost: Paul HeppenstallCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of excessive excitability within sensory neurons. There has been significant progress over the last decade in understanding the molecular basis by which sensory neurons transduce and subsequently transmit noxious (ie. tissue damaging) stimuli giving rise to the sensation of pain. Over this same period we have recognized that mutations in such ion channels can result in primary pain disorders in humans providing great insight into the genetics of pain. An excellent example is the voltage gated ion channel NaV 1.7. Loss of function mutations in this ion channel result in congenital inability to experience pain and gain of function mutations can cause a number of distinct neuropathic pain disorders including erythromelalgia, paroxysmal extreme pain disorder and small fibre neuropathy. The fact that mutations in such channels can cause monogenic pain disorders makes them attractive analgesic drug targets and we are seeing a number of therapeutics being developed on this basis. Given that spontaneous activity is critical for the induction and maintenance of peripheral neuropathic pain we are now exploring techniques to reversibly silence sensory neurons. We have found that an engineered glutamate gated ion channel (which no longer responds to glutamate but is activated by Ivermectin) is very effective at electrically silencing sensory neurons both in vitro and in vivo. I will discuss how this can be used as a translational tool to reverse pain related hypersensitivity in animal models of neuropathic pain.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 12 May 2017, 10:00Add to calendarDNMT3A in Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Cancer and AgingMargaret Goodell, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA, USAHost: Philip Avner / Christophe LancrinCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3A) has recently emerged as an important tumor suppressor in hematologic malignancies, and its ablation in mouse hematopoietic stem cells inhibits differentiation. We will describe the use of DNMT3A knockout mice to study its role in myeloid and lymphoid malignancy development and its function in maintaining global DNA methylation. The role of DNMT3A mutations in intercellular competition in the context of aging will also be discussed.
Hamburg Speaker
POSTPONED - Friday, 12 May 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAnne Tuukkanen, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 12 May 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedGregory Chirikjian , The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, USAHost: Thomas SchneiderSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 15 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announced Prof. Katrin Rittinger, The Francis Crick Institute, Molecular Structure of Cell Signalling Laboratory,London, United KingdomHost: Esther OrtegaEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 19 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarStructural dynamics of the breast cancer genome in response to hormonesMiguel Beato, Gene Regulation, Stem Cells and Cancer Program , Centre de Regulació Genòmica (CRG), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Barcelona , Spain, , SpainHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Eukaryotic cells decode environmental information via receptors and signalling networks that converge in the cell nucleus to adjust an integrated gene expression response. We study the response of breast cancer cells to the steroid hormones estrogens and progesterone (Pg) acting via their respective receptors (ER and PR, respectively) to decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms.

The precise organization in nucleosomes of the DNA sequences recognized by PR is a requisite for receptor binding and the initiation of chromatin remodelling leading to displacement of histones H1 and H2A/H2B. Remodelling depends on receptor-associated enzymes, including histone modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, as well as activated PARP1, which uses the NAD+ synthesized by NMNAT1 in the cell nucleus to synthesize large amounts of Poly-ADP-Ribose (PAR). These epigenetic processes are required for chromatin remodelling and the rapid regulation of thousand of genes leading ultimately to cell proliferation in response to hormone.

In addition to nucleosomes, higher levels of genome organization also participate in hormone action. The conserved partition of the genome in consecutive topological associating domains (TADs) contributes to coordination of the hormonal response. Hormone regulated genes tend to segregate into TADs that respond as a whole with either activation or repression of transcription. Genes in one TAD can be all activated by one hormone and all repressed by another hormone. Thus, TADs behave as regulons in the response of cells to external signals. High-resolution Hi-C data reveal the role of dominant enhancers in organizing the differential hormonal response within TADs.

The extensive chromatin remodelling observed in response to hormones requires the transient accumulation in the cell nucleus of large amounts of PAR, which is subsequently degraded to ADPR. A fraction of this ADPR is converted to ATP in the nucleus by NUDIX5 in the presence of PPi. NUDIX5 is a homodimer known to catalyse the hydrolysis of ADPR to AMP and R-5-P, but in response to hormone NUDIX5 is dephosphorylated at T45, leading to a conformational change of the homodimer that enables it to catalyse the reaction of ADPR with PPi to generate ATP and R-5-P. The ATP generated in the cell nucleus is essential for chromatin remodelling and gene regulation by estrogens or progesterone, as well as for DNA damage repair. NUDIX5 is overexpressed in breast cancers and is a marker for poor prognosis. Thus, it represents a novel target for breast cancer management.

Science and Society
Monday, 22 May 2017, 18:00Add to calendarMenschliche Gehirne aus dem Labor Fortschritte und Grenzen der modernen StammzellforschungJürgen Knoblich, Institut für Molekulare Biotechnologie, Wien, AustriaHost: Halldór StefánssonPrint Media Academy
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 26 May 2017, 10:00Add to calendarThe social brain in adolescenceSarah-Jayne Blakemore, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, London, UK, , United KingdomHost: Philip Avner / Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: This talk focuses on how the social brain, that is the network of brain regions involved in understanding others, develops during adolescence. Social cognitive processes involved in navigating an increasingly complex social world continue to develop throughout human adolescence. Areas of the social brain undergo significant reorganisation in terms of structure and function during the second decade of life, which possibly reflects a sensitive period for adapting to the social environment. The changes in social environment that occur during adolescence interact with increasing executive functions, heightened social sensitivity and the developing social brain to influence a number of adolescent behaviours, including risk-taking, peer influence and self-consciousness.
Tags: Neurobiology
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 29 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedThomas Delong, UC Denver, USAHost: Lars VeltenSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 30 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedStefania Castagnetti, Marine Station Villefranche sur Mer, Nice, FranceHost: Stefano De RenzisSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 9 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAlberto Bacci, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière ICM (Brain & Spine Institute), Paris, FranceHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Friday, 9 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendarDo microbes control the mind? Issues in brain, gut and microbiota researchMaureen O'Malley, University of Bordeaux, FranceHost: Rob MeijersSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: Microbiota research uses a sequencing-based approach to examine the composition and function of microbial communities in specific niches. Some of the most intensive research in this area has been carried out on the gut microbiota of animals, particularly humans and mice. Many associations have been made between microbiota composition and various health or disease states. A rapidly expanding area of investigation is concerned with the connections between animal gut microbiota, the enteric nervous system, and various brain and behavioural states. Links have been made between microbiota composition and disorders such as autism, anxiety and depression. Microbiota even seem to influence general cognition and memory. Many strong interpretations have been made of these findings, including claims that microbiota control animal behaviour in the manner of puppeteers controlling puppets. I will examine these claims in the context of a variety of problems in microbiota research methodology and what they can say about causality.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 12 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedWieland Huttner, MPI-CBG, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 16 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedClement Blanchet, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Tuesday, 20 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendarCatastrophic Thinking: Extinction and the Value of DiversityDavid Sepkoski, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Why do we care about preserving biodiversity? At the beginning of the 21st century biodiversity has come to be seen as an intrinsic scientific and cultural value. In other words, biological diversity the sheer multiplicity and heterogeneity of living things is now understood to have an inherent value that is not reducible to the utilitarian or aesthetic worth of any particular individual species: the value of diversity is diversity itself. Extinction plays a central role in this understanding of biodiversity, since diversity is something that is understood to be fragile and tenuous, constantly endangered by the threat of loss. Whereas most historians who have examined this phenomenon have placed the modern biodiversity movement in the context of a history of conservation biology and endangered species protection, I want to frame it in a new perspective. This talk will examine the influence of biological theories about the nature and dynamics of extinction and especially mass extinction on the current valuation of biological diversity. I will focus particularly on the ways that new understandings of extinction in the past for example, the extinction of the dinosaurs have converged with scientific and cultural anxieties about the present the specters of global warming, nuclear war, and biodiversity loss. I will argue that this new model of extinction has played a prominent conceptual and rhetorical role in debates surrounding the current biodiversity crisis, which I will examine in critical historical perspective.
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 23 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedIva Pichová, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech RepublicSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 27 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMaria Carmo-Fonseca , University of Lisbon, PortugalHost: Isabel Chillon EMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 4 July 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedEdward Lemke, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Francesco BisiakEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 6 July 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedOlivier Pourquié, Harvard Medical School, Department of Genetics/The Brigham and Women s Hospital, USAHost: Alexander AulehlaThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 7 July 2017, 13:00Add to calendarSmall angle scattering data and model validation at SASBDBAl Kikhney, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 14 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedGene Myers, MPI-CBG, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 15 September 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedYonca Ural-Blimke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 18 September 2017, 15:00Add to calendarThe Ethics of Biomedical Big Data: Between individual and public health interestsBrent Mittelstadt, University of Oxford, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Science and Society
Friday, 29 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedHelga Nowotny, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, SwitzerlandHost: Halldór Stefánsson CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 6 October 2017, 10:00Add to calendarSwitching genes on and off during erythropoiesisDouglas Higgs, MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Philip Avner / Christophe LancrinCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 13 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAlla Karpova, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Virginia, USA, USAHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 20 October 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCy Jeffries, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 3 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarEpigenetic variation and non-genetic inheritanceAnne Ferguson-Smith, Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge , UK, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma
Abstract:
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 9 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBing Ren, University of California, USAHost: Jan KorbelThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Baker, University of Washington, USAHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 17 November 2017, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenetic mechanisms in early mammalian developmentMaria Elena Torres-Padilla, Institute of Epigenetics and Stem Cells (IES) , Helmholtz Zentrum München, GermanyHost: Philip Avner CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 24 November 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDaniel Franke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Thursday, 30 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarMolecular gastronomy: questions of scientific strategy and applicationsHervé This, International Centre for Molecular Gastronomy AgroParisTech-INRA, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Molecular gastronomy is the scientific discipline that looks for the mechanisms of phenomena occurring during food preparation. It was created (formally in 1988) because it was realized that a wealth of original phenomena were neglected by physical chemistry, so that possibilities of discoveries were many. It develops in many countries of the world (and should not be confused with cooking, and in particular with "molecular cooking" or "molecular cuisine", which are applications).
How to make discoveries? This question is of course not restricted to molecular gastronomy, but some examples of results can show various ways of getting scientific results, the most important being probably the set up of new observation tools, or the idea that "Any result should be considered as a "projection" of general cases that we have to invent".
Concerning applications, the latest is called "note by note cooking", and it is the exact equivalent of synthetic music, a reason why it could also be called synthetic cooking. The definition is simply: make food from pure compounds, instead of tradition food ingredients (vegetables, meats, fruits, fishs, eggs...). This culinary trend is spreading today.
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 1 December 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedSpyros Chatziefthimiou, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 12 January 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTransgenerational epigenetic inheritance: Evidence in mammals and potential mechanisms involving the germlineIsabelle Mansuy, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo